Swiftcourt’s quiet revolution

Swiftcourt rebels against legal counseling that is slow and includes a big fee. But they haven’t found a way to replace the lawyer – yet.

Swiftcourt rebels against legal counseling that is slow and includes a big fee. But they haven’t found a way to replace the lawyer – yet.

A few years ago Johan Hedén Hultgren was as a legal researcher at a law firm in Gothenburg. It was hardly an ideal fit. The traditional chain of command annoyed him: younger employees did mountains of work, and it would still have a partner’s name on it. He did not feel that the power structure allowed space for creativity. Fast forward to Spring 2013. Hultgren talked to one of his lawyer friends about the law field’s inability to handle small cases. They came up with Swiftcourt, a digital platform that solves disputes between online sellers and buyers who did not get the motorbike or sound system they expected.

“An established law firm would never touch anything that is worth less than 100.000 DKK. But with minor disputes we outsource part of the legal research to the user. On Swiftcourt they can for instance upload a picture of their ruined product. Our startup is very much about empoverment,” says Hultgren.

“Our startup is very much about empowerment”

He has his desk on Rainmaking Loft’s Ground Floor with co-founder Hampus Sahlin and two new recruitments. They will focus on product development until the end of the year. The plan is to use Scandinavia as a test market and expand from here. Not just geographically, the platform is able to cover more types of transactions gone awry between individuals.

“Natural next fields would be loans and apartment rental. In these cases we can use the digital development to make the legal process efficient. But when it comes to complex areas of law it is very hard to find a digital alternative to an experienced lawyer. You cannot leave the human out.”